Despite detailed evaluation of disease-associated prognostic factors, little is known about the impact of overweight in autograft programs for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. In order to address this issue, 121 NHL patients were retrospectively evaluated. They had been upfront (92 patients) or in relapse (29 patients) and received high-dose sequential (HDS) chemotherapy including peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) autograft. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters; overweight was defined as BMI > or = 28. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the prognostic implication of overweight and other known prognostic indicators on overall (OS) and event-free (EFS) survival for the entire group and overweight and non-overweight (reference) subgroups. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the estimated 5-year OS and EFS for the entire group were 58% and 49%, respectively. Twenty-eight patients (23%) had BMI > or = 28. Their median OS and EFS were 2.2 and 1.4 years, respectively, whereas median OS and EFS for the reference group have not been reached, with a 5-year projection of 65 and 55%, respectively (P < 0.002). On multivariate analysis, the risk of death among overweight patients was 2.9 (CI, 1.3-6.2) times that of the reference group; using EFS as the end point, a similar association between overweight and survival was observed. In conclusion, in high-risk NHL patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy and PBPC autografting overweight is associated with a poorer outcome.

Overweight as an adverse prognostic factor for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autograft / C. Tarella, D. Caracciolo, P. Gavarotti, C. Argentino, F. Zallio, P. Corradini, D. Novero, C. Magnani, A. Pileri. - In: BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION. - ISSN 0268-3369. - 26:11(2000 Dec), pp. 1185-1191.

Overweight as an adverse prognostic factor for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autograft

C. Tarella;P. Corradini;
2000

Abstract

Despite detailed evaluation of disease-associated prognostic factors, little is known about the impact of overweight in autograft programs for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. In order to address this issue, 121 NHL patients were retrospectively evaluated. They had been upfront (92 patients) or in relapse (29 patients) and received high-dose sequential (HDS) chemotherapy including peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) autograft. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters; overweight was defined as BMI > or = 28. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the prognostic implication of overweight and other known prognostic indicators on overall (OS) and event-free (EFS) survival for the entire group and overweight and non-overweight (reference) subgroups. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the estimated 5-year OS and EFS for the entire group were 58% and 49%, respectively. Twenty-eight patients (23%) had BMI > or = 28. Their median OS and EFS were 2.2 and 1.4 years, respectively, whereas median OS and EFS for the reference group have not been reached, with a 5-year projection of 65 and 55%, respectively (P < 0.002). On multivariate analysis, the risk of death among overweight patients was 2.9 (CI, 1.3-6.2) times that of the reference group; using EFS as the end point, a similar association between overweight and survival was observed. In conclusion, in high-risk NHL patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy and PBPC autografting overweight is associated with a poorer outcome.
Obesity; Disease-Free Survival; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Humans; Retrospective Studies; Body Mass Index; Survival Rate; Adult; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Follow-Up Studies; Middle Aged; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Female; Male; Proportional Hazards Models
Settore MED/15 - Malattie del Sangue
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/181111
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