The strategy to accelerate blood lactate concentration [La-] removal and to restore resting values at the end of a competition or among training sessions is actually a matter of debate. In particular, the role of alternative modalities (massage and stretching) in respect to active recovery in accelerate [La-] removal has been investigated with controversial findings. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of five different recovery modalities on [La-] removal and on maximum force output restoration after a fatiguing exercise. On 8 active male participants [age 23±1 yrs; stature 1.76±0.07 m; body mass 74±11 kg; mean±standard deviation (SD)], the maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) on a cycle ergometer was assessed. Thereafter, on five different occasions, an 8-min heavy-intensity exercise at 90% VO2max, followed by five different recovery modalities, each lasting 10 min, in a random order (passive, active, sports massage, fascial release massage and passive stretching) was performed. Throughout each session, the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensor muscles, the surface electromyogram (EMG) from the vastus lateralis muscle, [La-], VO2 and other cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. During the 10-min recovery, [La-] was sampled every minute, to calculate the time constant (τ) of [La-] kinetics. Despite all variables were significantly changed at the end of the heavy-intensity exercise compared to pre-exercise condition, no differences in metabolic, cardiorespiratory and EMG parameters were found among the 5 different sessions. Active recovery showed the lowest [La-] values and the shortest τ (P<0.05) compared to the other recovery modalities, among which no significant differences were found. Although widely used after competitions or during training sessions, massage and passive stretching did not accelerate [La-] removal, thus making questionable their administration instead of active recovery.

Effect of different recovery modalities on lactic acid removal after a cycle exercise of heavy intensity / E. Cè, E. Limonta, M.A. Maggioni, S. Rampichini, A. Veicsteinas, F. Esposito. ((Intervento presentato al 3. convegno Convegno Nazionale della Società Italiana delle Scienze Motorie e Sportive tenutosi a Verona nel 2011.

Effect of different recovery modalities on lactic acid removal after a cycle exercise of heavy intensity

E. Cè;E. Limonta;M.A. Maggioni;S. Rampichini;A. Veicsteinas;F. Esposito
2011-09-30

Abstract

The strategy to accelerate blood lactate concentration [La-] removal and to restore resting values at the end of a competition or among training sessions is actually a matter of debate. In particular, the role of alternative modalities (massage and stretching) in respect to active recovery in accelerate [La-] removal has been investigated with controversial findings. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of five different recovery modalities on [La-] removal and on maximum force output restoration after a fatiguing exercise. On 8 active male participants [age 23±1 yrs; stature 1.76±0.07 m; body mass 74±11 kg; mean±standard deviation (SD)], the maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) on a cycle ergometer was assessed. Thereafter, on five different occasions, an 8-min heavy-intensity exercise at 90% VO2max, followed by five different recovery modalities, each lasting 10 min, in a random order (passive, active, sports massage, fascial release massage and passive stretching) was performed. Throughout each session, the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensor muscles, the surface electromyogram (EMG) from the vastus lateralis muscle, [La-], VO2 and other cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. During the 10-min recovery, [La-] was sampled every minute, to calculate the time constant (τ) of [La-] kinetics. Despite all variables were significantly changed at the end of the heavy-intensity exercise compared to pre-exercise condition, no differences in metabolic, cardiorespiratory and EMG parameters were found among the 5 different sessions. Active recovery showed the lowest [La-] values and the shortest τ (P<0.05) compared to the other recovery modalities, among which no significant differences were found. Although widely used after competitions or during training sessions, massage and passive stretching did not accelerate [La-] removal, thus making questionable their administration instead of active recovery.
lactate wash out ; recovery ; heavy intensity exercise
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Società Italiana delle Scienze Motorie e Sportive
Effect of different recovery modalities on lactic acid removal after a cycle exercise of heavy intensity / E. Cè, E. Limonta, M.A. Maggioni, S. Rampichini, A. Veicsteinas, F. Esposito. ((Intervento presentato al 3. convegno Convegno Nazionale della Società Italiana delle Scienze Motorie e Sportive tenutosi a Verona nel 2011.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/166894
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