OBJECTIVE: We have previously shown, in a cross-sectional study, that the reduction in umbilical vein blood flow in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses is due to reduced umbilical vein velocity. The purpose of this longitudinal study in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses was to determine whether the umbilical vein velocity reduction, which, in turn, reduces blood flow, persists throughout gestation or represents a late event that precedes indicated delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Twenty-one intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses with an abnormal umbilical artery velocimetry underwent serial sonographic and Doppler examinations from 23 to 36 weeks of gestation. Umbilical vein diameter and velocity were measured, and umbilical vein absolute (milliliters per minute) and weight-specific blood flow (milliliters per minute per kilogram) were calculated. Umbilical vein diameter, velocity, and blood flow were expressed per abdominal circumference. Intrauterine growth-restricted findings were compared to local reference data. RESULTS: Intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses showed persistent reductions in umbilical vein blood flow per abdominal circumference and weight-specific blood flow (milliliters per minute per kilogram) from the time of diagnosis of intrauterine growth-restriction. Umbilical vein velocity was reduced in the intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses, although umbilical vein diameter did not change. CONCLUSION: Reduction of umbilical vein blood flow is an early finding in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses, and it can persist for several weeks until delivery. This reduction in blood flow is due to reduced umbilical vein velocity.

Early and persistent reduction in umbilical vein blood flow in the growth-restricted fetus : A longitudinal study / S. Rigano, M. Bozzo, E. Ferrazzi, M. Bellotti, F.C. Battaglia, H. L. Galan. - In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. - ISSN 0002-9378. - 184:4(2001 Oct), pp. 834-838. [10.1067/mob.2001.117356]

Early and persistent reduction in umbilical vein blood flow in the growth-restricted fetus : A longitudinal study

S. Rigano
Primo
;
E. Ferrazzi;M. Bellotti;
2001-10

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We have previously shown, in a cross-sectional study, that the reduction in umbilical vein blood flow in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses is due to reduced umbilical vein velocity. The purpose of this longitudinal study in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses was to determine whether the umbilical vein velocity reduction, which, in turn, reduces blood flow, persists throughout gestation or represents a late event that precedes indicated delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Twenty-one intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses with an abnormal umbilical artery velocimetry underwent serial sonographic and Doppler examinations from 23 to 36 weeks of gestation. Umbilical vein diameter and velocity were measured, and umbilical vein absolute (milliliters per minute) and weight-specific blood flow (milliliters per minute per kilogram) were calculated. Umbilical vein diameter, velocity, and blood flow were expressed per abdominal circumference. Intrauterine growth-restricted findings were compared to local reference data. RESULTS: Intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses showed persistent reductions in umbilical vein blood flow per abdominal circumference and weight-specific blood flow (milliliters per minute per kilogram) from the time of diagnosis of intrauterine growth-restriction. Umbilical vein velocity was reduced in the intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses, although umbilical vein diameter did not change. CONCLUSION: Reduction of umbilical vein blood flow is an early finding in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses, and it can persist for several weeks until delivery. This reduction in blood flow is due to reduced umbilical vein velocity.
Doppler ultrasound; Intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR); Umbilical vein blood flow; Umbilical vein velocity
Settore MED/40 - Ginecologia e Ostetricia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/157580
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