Background: Low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening can detect early stage lung cancer in high-risk populations. However, no data on repeated annual screening over more than 5 years are available, and the impact of screening on lung cancer mortality is controversial. Methods: We analysed outcomes in high-risk asymptomatic volunteers (smokers and former smokers, >50 years) enrolled in a pilot study over 1 year from June 2000, who received annual low-dose CT for 7 years. Cumulative lung cancer incidence and survival were represented by Kaplan−Meier curves. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios were used to estimate risks relative to the general Italian and US population. Results: Compliance was 86% at the end of the seventh year in 1035 recruited volunteers (71% men, mean age 58 years). Lung cancer was diagnosed in 54 (5.3%); radical surgery was possible in 48/54 (87%); 39/54 (72%) had stage I disease. Five-year survival was 63% overall, 89% for stage I cases. During 6308 person-years of observation, 47 participants had died versus 75 expected in the Italian general population standardised for age and sex. Fourteen lung cancer deaths were registered versus 27 expected in a standardised US smoker population. Conclusions: Seventy percent of screening-diagnosed patients had stage I disease, and the survival of screen-detected cancer patients was high. Lung cancer mortality was favourable compared to age- and sex-matched population of US smokers, suggesting that mortality can be lowered by screening, although larger trials with longer follow-up are necessary to confirm these findings.

Long-term outcomes of a pilot CT screening for lung cancer / G. Veronesi, P. Maisonneuve, L. Spaggiari, C. Rampinelli, G. Pelosi, L. Preda, F. Petrella, A. Borri, M. Casiraghi, R. Bertolotti, N. Rotmensz, M. Bellomi. - In: ECANCERMEDICALSCIENCE. - ISSN 1754-6605. - 4:1(2010 May 13), pp. 186.1-186.8. [10.3332/ecancer.2010.186]

Long-term outcomes of a pilot CT screening for lung cancer

L. Spaggiari;G. Pelosi;F. Petrella;M. Casiraghi;M. Bellomi
2010-05-13

Abstract

Background: Low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening can detect early stage lung cancer in high-risk populations. However, no data on repeated annual screening over more than 5 years are available, and the impact of screening on lung cancer mortality is controversial. Methods: We analysed outcomes in high-risk asymptomatic volunteers (smokers and former smokers, >50 years) enrolled in a pilot study over 1 year from June 2000, who received annual low-dose CT for 7 years. Cumulative lung cancer incidence and survival were represented by Kaplan−Meier curves. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios were used to estimate risks relative to the general Italian and US population. Results: Compliance was 86% at the end of the seventh year in 1035 recruited volunteers (71% men, mean age 58 years). Lung cancer was diagnosed in 54 (5.3%); radical surgery was possible in 48/54 (87%); 39/54 (72%) had stage I disease. Five-year survival was 63% overall, 89% for stage I cases. During 6308 person-years of observation, 47 participants had died versus 75 expected in the Italian general population standardised for age and sex. Fourteen lung cancer deaths were registered versus 27 expected in a standardised US smoker population. Conclusions: Seventy percent of screening-diagnosed patients had stage I disease, and the survival of screen-detected cancer patients was high. Lung cancer mortality was favourable compared to age- and sex-matched population of US smokers, suggesting that mortality can be lowered by screening, although larger trials with longer follow-up are necessary to confirm these findings.
Settore MED/36 - Diagnostica per Immagini e Radioterapia
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
can-4-186.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 479.75 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
479.75 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/154026
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact