Abstract: Background: The active range of motion of human cervical spine naturally changes during lifetime; sport practice may also modify cervical range of motion. Purpose: To investigate the effect of rugby league practice and age on active cervical range of motion. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Active cervical range of motion was quantified in 34 Rugby League players and 70 healthy control men (adolescents, 15-16 years; young adults, 19-25 years; adults, 31-45 years) using an optoelectronic motion analyser. Principal plane movements (flexion-extension, axial rotation, lateral bending) and concomitant out-of-plane motions were computed, and compared by factorial analyses of variance. Results: Aging significantly reduced active cervical flexion-extension (from adolescence to adult age: about 15° in control participants, 21° in rugby players) and lateral bending (from adolescence to adult age: about 6° in control participants, 17° in rugby players). A trend in motion reduction was observed for axial rotation. Significant reductions were found for concomitant movements in other planes. Rugby league practice significantly modified active cervical lateral bending: during adolescence and young adulthood it had a beneficial effect, increasing the range of motion of 8-11°, but after the third decade of life the effect reversed. Some differences were observed also for concomitant out-of-plane movements. Conclusions: Both aging and rugby practice significantly modified active cervical range of motion. Clinical Relevance: The non-invasive assessment of active cervical movements may identify the players with altered neck mobility, and who may potentially be at larger risk for damages. They might benefit from specific cervical muscle training.

Cervical Range of Motion in Rugby League Players / C. Sforza, C. Corradini, G.P. Grassi, L. Borgonovo, M.C. Turci, D. Galante, V.F. Ferrario. - In: THE OPEN SPORTS MEDICINE JOURNAL. - ISSN 1874-3870. - 4(2010), pp. 121-125.

Cervical Range of Motion in Rugby League Players

C. Sforza;C. Corradini;M.C. Turci;D. Galante;V.F. Ferrario
2010

Abstract

Abstract: Background: The active range of motion of human cervical spine naturally changes during lifetime; sport practice may also modify cervical range of motion. Purpose: To investigate the effect of rugby league practice and age on active cervical range of motion. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Active cervical range of motion was quantified in 34 Rugby League players and 70 healthy control men (adolescents, 15-16 years; young adults, 19-25 years; adults, 31-45 years) using an optoelectronic motion analyser. Principal plane movements (flexion-extension, axial rotation, lateral bending) and concomitant out-of-plane motions were computed, and compared by factorial analyses of variance. Results: Aging significantly reduced active cervical flexion-extension (from adolescence to adult age: about 15° in control participants, 21° in rugby players) and lateral bending (from adolescence to adult age: about 6° in control participants, 17° in rugby players). A trend in motion reduction was observed for axial rotation. Significant reductions were found for concomitant movements in other planes. Rugby league practice significantly modified active cervical lateral bending: during adolescence and young adulthood it had a beneficial effect, increasing the range of motion of 8-11°, but after the third decade of life the effect reversed. Some differences were observed also for concomitant out-of-plane movements. Conclusions: Both aging and rugby practice significantly modified active cervical range of motion. Clinical Relevance: The non-invasive assessment of active cervical movements may identify the players with altered neck mobility, and who may potentially be at larger risk for damages. They might benefit from specific cervical muscle training.
Settore BIO/16 - Anatomia Umana
Settore MED/33 - Malattie Apparato Locomotore
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/146498
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