Despite the impressive increase of home blood pressure monitoring (BPM) among hypertensive patients over the last few years, a limited number of studies have analysed the rate of home BPM and its relationship with target blood pressure (BP) control, in representative samples of the hypertensive population. The objectives of the study were first to evaluate the prevalence of home BPM in a large selected group of treated hypertensive patients referred to our outpatient hypertension hospital clinic. Second, to assess the rate of satisfactory clinic BP control in patients with or without familiarity with home BPM. In all, 1350 consecutive hypertensive patients who attended our hypertension centre during a period of 12 months and were regularly followed up by the same medical team were included in the study. After informed consent all patients underwent the following procedures: (1) accurate medical history (implemented by a structured questionnaire on demographic and clinical characteristics, including questions concerning home BPM); (2) physical examination; (3) clinic BP measurement; (4) routine examinations; and (5) standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. A total of 897 patients (66%) out of 1350 (687 men, 663 women, age 58.6±12.3 years, mean clinic BP 141±16/87±9mmHg) were regularly practising home BPM. In this group of patients, home BPM was associated with a significantly greater rate of satisfactory BP control (49.2 vs 45.6%, P<0.01). Patients performing home BPM were more frequently men (54 vs 46%, P< 0.02) younger (average age 57.8±12.0 vs 60.3±12.7 years , P<0.001) and with a higher educational level (defined by more than 8 years of school, 71 vs 55%, P<0.05) than their counterparts. There were no significant differences in duration of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity, smoking, diabetes, associated cardiovascular diseases, left ventricular hypertrophy and compliance with drug treatment. This study demonstrates that: (1) home BPM is widely performed by hypertensive patients managed in a hypertension hospital clinic; (2) this practice is associated with a significantly higher rate of clinic BP control; and (3) age, male gender and educational level influence the adoption of home BPM.

Home blood pressure measurement and its relationship with blood pressure control in a large selected hypertensive population / C. Cuspidi, S. Meani, V.Fusi, M. Salerno, C. Valerio, B. Severgnini, E. Catini, G. Leonetti, F. Magrini, A. Zanchetti. - In: JOURNAL OF HUMAN HYPERTENSION. - ISSN 0950-9240. - 18:10(2004), pp. 725-731. [10.1038/sj.jhh.1001737]

Home blood pressure measurement and its relationship with blood pressure control in a large selected hypertensive population

S. Meani;V.Fusi;C. Valerio;E. Catini;G. Leonetti;F. Magrini;
2004

Abstract

Despite the impressive increase of home blood pressure monitoring (BPM) among hypertensive patients over the last few years, a limited number of studies have analysed the rate of home BPM and its relationship with target blood pressure (BP) control, in representative samples of the hypertensive population. The objectives of the study were first to evaluate the prevalence of home BPM in a large selected group of treated hypertensive patients referred to our outpatient hypertension hospital clinic. Second, to assess the rate of satisfactory clinic BP control in patients with or without familiarity with home BPM. In all, 1350 consecutive hypertensive patients who attended our hypertension centre during a period of 12 months and were regularly followed up by the same medical team were included in the study. After informed consent all patients underwent the following procedures: (1) accurate medical history (implemented by a structured questionnaire on demographic and clinical characteristics, including questions concerning home BPM); (2) physical examination; (3) clinic BP measurement; (4) routine examinations; and (5) standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. A total of 897 patients (66%) out of 1350 (687 men, 663 women, age 58.6±12.3 years, mean clinic BP 141±16/87±9mmHg) were regularly practising home BPM. In this group of patients, home BPM was associated with a significantly greater rate of satisfactory BP control (49.2 vs 45.6%, P<0.01). Patients performing home BPM were more frequently men (54 vs 46%, P< 0.02) younger (average age 57.8±12.0 vs 60.3±12.7 years , P<0.001) and with a higher educational level (defined by more than 8 years of school, 71 vs 55%, P<0.05) than their counterparts. There were no significant differences in duration of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity, smoking, diabetes, associated cardiovascular diseases, left ventricular hypertrophy and compliance with drug treatment. This study demonstrates that: (1) home BPM is widely performed by hypertensive patients managed in a hypertension hospital clinic; (2) this practice is associated with a significantly higher rate of clinic BP control; and (3) age, male gender and educational level influence the adoption of home BPM.
Blood pressure control; Home blood pressure monitoring
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/12295
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