BackgroundThe impact of seasonal influenza vaccination (SIV) on mortality is still controversial; some studies have claimed that increasing vaccination coverage rates is beneficial, while others have found no significant association. This study aimed to construct a granular longitudinal dataset of local VCRs and assess their effect on pneumonia- and influenza-related (P & I) mortality among Italian adults aged & GE; 65 years. MethodsNUTS-3 (nomenclature of territorial units for statistics) level data on SIV coverage were collected via a survey of local data holders. Fixed- and random-effects panel regression modeling, when adjusted for potential confounders, was performed to assess the association between local SIV coverage rates and P & I mortality in older adults. ResultsA total of 1,144 local VCRs from 2003 to 2019 were ascertained. In the fully adjusted fixed-effects model, each 1% increase in vaccination coverage was associated (P < 0.001) with a 0.6% (95% CI: 0.3-0.9%) average over-time decrease in P & I mortality. With an annual average of 9,293 P & I deaths in Italy, this model suggested that 56 deaths could have been avoided each year by increasing SIV coverage by 1%. The random-effects model produced similar results. The base-case results were robust in a sensitivity analysis. ConclusionOver the last two decades, Italian jurisdictions with higher SIV uptake had, on average, fewer P & I deaths among older adults. Local policy-makers should implement effective strategies to increase SIV coverage in the Italian senior population.

Population-level benefits of increasing influenza vaccination uptake among Italian older adults: results from a granular panel model / A. Domnich, A. Orsi, D. Panatto, M. Ogliastro, A. Barca, F. Bert, D. Cereda, M. Chironna, C. Costantino, D. Fiacchini, E. Pariani, C. Rizzo, E. Volpe, G. Icardi. - In: FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 2296-2565. - 11:(2023), pp. 1224175.1-1224175.7. [10.3389/fpubh.2023.1224175]

Population-level benefits of increasing influenza vaccination uptake among Italian older adults: results from a granular panel model

E. Pariani;
2023

Abstract

BackgroundThe impact of seasonal influenza vaccination (SIV) on mortality is still controversial; some studies have claimed that increasing vaccination coverage rates is beneficial, while others have found no significant association. This study aimed to construct a granular longitudinal dataset of local VCRs and assess their effect on pneumonia- and influenza-related (P & I) mortality among Italian adults aged & GE; 65 years. MethodsNUTS-3 (nomenclature of territorial units for statistics) level data on SIV coverage were collected via a survey of local data holders. Fixed- and random-effects panel regression modeling, when adjusted for potential confounders, was performed to assess the association between local SIV coverage rates and P & I mortality in older adults. ResultsA total of 1,144 local VCRs from 2003 to 2019 were ascertained. In the fully adjusted fixed-effects model, each 1% increase in vaccination coverage was associated (P < 0.001) with a 0.6% (95% CI: 0.3-0.9%) average over-time decrease in P & I mortality. With an annual average of 9,293 P & I deaths in Italy, this model suggested that 56 deaths could have been avoided each year by increasing SIV coverage by 1%. The random-effects model produced similar results. The base-case results were robust in a sensitivity analysis. ConclusionOver the last two decades, Italian jurisdictions with higher SIV uptake had, on average, fewer P & I deaths among older adults. Local policy-makers should implement effective strategies to increase SIV coverage in the Italian senior population.
Italy; influenza; modeling; older adults; vaccination; vaccine impact
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
2023
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1051090
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