Schizophrenia is thought to reflect aberrant connectivity within cortico-cortical and reentrant thalamo-cortical loops, which physiologically integrate and coordinate the function of multiple cortical and subcortical structures. Despite extensive research, reliable biomarkers of such "dys-connectivity" remain to be identified at the onset of psychosis, and before exposure to antipsychotic drugs. Because slow waves travel across the brain during sleep, they represent an ideal paradigm to study pathological conditions affecting brain connectivity. Here, we provide proof-of-concept evidence for a novel approach to investigate slow wave traveling properties in First-Episode Psychosis (FEP) with high-density electroencephalography (EEG). Whole-night sleep recordings of 5 drug-naïve FEP and 5 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects were obtained with a 256-channel EEG system. One patient was re-recorded after 6 months and 3 years of continuous clozapine treatment. Slow wave detection and traveling properties were obtained with an open-source toolbox. Slow wave density and slow wave traveled distance (measured as the line of longest displacement) were significantly lower in patients (p < 0.05). In the patient who was tested longitudinally during effective clozapine treatment, slow wave density normalized, while traveling distance only partially recovered. These preliminary findings suggest that slow wave traveling could be employed in larger samples to detect cortical "dys-connectivity" at psychosis onset.

Proof-of-concept evidence for high-density EEG investigation of sleep slow wave traveling in First-Episode Psychosis / A. Castelnovo, C. Casetta, S. Cavallotti, M. Marcatili, L. DEL FABRO, M.P. Canevini, S. Sarasso, A. D'Agostino. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 14:1(2024), pp. 6826.1-6826.9. [10.1038/s41598-024-57476-2]

Proof-of-concept evidence for high-density EEG investigation of sleep slow wave traveling in First-Episode Psychosis

C. Casetta;S. Cavallotti;M. Marcatili;L. DEL FABRO;M.P. Canevini;S. Sarasso
;
A. D'Agostino
2024

Abstract

Schizophrenia is thought to reflect aberrant connectivity within cortico-cortical and reentrant thalamo-cortical loops, which physiologically integrate and coordinate the function of multiple cortical and subcortical structures. Despite extensive research, reliable biomarkers of such "dys-connectivity" remain to be identified at the onset of psychosis, and before exposure to antipsychotic drugs. Because slow waves travel across the brain during sleep, they represent an ideal paradigm to study pathological conditions affecting brain connectivity. Here, we provide proof-of-concept evidence for a novel approach to investigate slow wave traveling properties in First-Episode Psychosis (FEP) with high-density electroencephalography (EEG). Whole-night sleep recordings of 5 drug-naïve FEP and 5 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects were obtained with a 256-channel EEG system. One patient was re-recorded after 6 months and 3 years of continuous clozapine treatment. Slow wave detection and traveling properties were obtained with an open-source toolbox. Slow wave density and slow wave traveled distance (measured as the line of longest displacement) were significantly lower in patients (p < 0.05). In the patient who was tested longitudinally during effective clozapine treatment, slow wave density normalized, while traveling distance only partially recovered. These preliminary findings suggest that slow wave traveling could be employed in larger samples to detect cortical "dys-connectivity" at psychosis onset.
Brain plasticity; Clozapine; Connectivity; Early course psychosis; Schizophrenia; Slow waves
Settore MED/25 - Psichiatria
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
2024
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1047289
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