Despite the advent of numerous targeted therapies in clinical practice, anthracyclines, including doxorubicin (DOX), continue to play a pivotal role in breast cancer (BC) treatment. DOX directly disrupts DNA replication, demonstrating remarkable efficacy against BC cells. However, its non-specificity toward cancer cells leads to significant side effects, limiting its clinical utility. Interestingly, DOX can also enhance the antitumor immune response by promoting immunogenic cell death in BC cells, thereby facilitating the presentation of tumor antigens to the adaptive immune system. However, the generation of an adaptive immune response involves highly proliferative processes, which may be adversely affected by DOX-induced cytotoxicity. Therefore, understanding the impact of DOX on dividing T cells becomes crucial, to deepen our understanding and potentially devise strategies to shield anti-tumor immunity from DOX-induced toxicity. Our investigation focused on studying DOX uptake and its effects on human lymphocytes. We collected lymphocytes from healthy donors and BC patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Notably, patient-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) promptly internalized DOX when incubated in vitro or isolated immediately after NAC. These DOX-treated PBMCs exhibited significant proliferative impairment compared to untreated cells or those isolated before treatment initiation. Intriguingly, among diverse lymphocyte sub-populations, CD8 + T cells exhibited the highest uptake of DOX. To address this concern, we explored a novel DOX formulation encapsulated in ferritin nanocages (FerOX). FerOX specifically targets tumors and effectively eradicates BC both in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, only T cells treated with FerOX exhibited reduced DOX internalization, potentially minimizing cytotoxic effects on adaptive immunity. Our findings underscore the importance of optimizing DOX delivery to enhance its antitumor efficacy while minimizing adverse effects, highlighting the pivotal role played by FerOX in mitigating DOX-induced toxicity towards T-cells, thereby positioning it as a promising DOX formulation. This study contributes valuable insights to modern cancer therapy and immunomodulation.

Impact of doxorubicin-loaded ferritin nanocages (FerOX) vs. free doxorubicin on T lymphocytes: a translational clinical study on breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy / M. Sevieri, F. Andreata, F. Mainini, L. Signati, F. Piccotti, M. Truffi, A. Bonizzi, L. Sitia, C. Pigliacelli, C. Morasso, B. Tagliaferri, F. Corsi, S. Mazzucchelli. - In: JOURNAL OF NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY. - ISSN 1477-3155. - 22:1(2024 Apr), pp. 184.1-184.16. [10.1186/s12951-024-02441-4]

Impact of doxorubicin-loaded ferritin nanocages (FerOX) vs. free doxorubicin on T lymphocytes: a translational clinical study on breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy

M. Sevieri
Primo
;
L. Signati;A. Bonizzi;L. Sitia;F. Corsi
Penultimo
;
S. Mazzucchelli
Ultimo
2024

Abstract

Despite the advent of numerous targeted therapies in clinical practice, anthracyclines, including doxorubicin (DOX), continue to play a pivotal role in breast cancer (BC) treatment. DOX directly disrupts DNA replication, demonstrating remarkable efficacy against BC cells. However, its non-specificity toward cancer cells leads to significant side effects, limiting its clinical utility. Interestingly, DOX can also enhance the antitumor immune response by promoting immunogenic cell death in BC cells, thereby facilitating the presentation of tumor antigens to the adaptive immune system. However, the generation of an adaptive immune response involves highly proliferative processes, which may be adversely affected by DOX-induced cytotoxicity. Therefore, understanding the impact of DOX on dividing T cells becomes crucial, to deepen our understanding and potentially devise strategies to shield anti-tumor immunity from DOX-induced toxicity. Our investigation focused on studying DOX uptake and its effects on human lymphocytes. We collected lymphocytes from healthy donors and BC patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Notably, patient-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) promptly internalized DOX when incubated in vitro or isolated immediately after NAC. These DOX-treated PBMCs exhibited significant proliferative impairment compared to untreated cells or those isolated before treatment initiation. Intriguingly, among diverse lymphocyte sub-populations, CD8 + T cells exhibited the highest uptake of DOX. To address this concern, we explored a novel DOX formulation encapsulated in ferritin nanocages (FerOX). FerOX specifically targets tumors and effectively eradicates BC both in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, only T cells treated with FerOX exhibited reduced DOX internalization, potentially minimizing cytotoxic effects on adaptive immunity. Our findings underscore the importance of optimizing DOX delivery to enhance its antitumor efficacy while minimizing adverse effects, highlighting the pivotal role played by FerOX in mitigating DOX-induced toxicity towards T-cells, thereby positioning it as a promising DOX formulation. This study contributes valuable insights to modern cancer therapy and immunomodulation.
Breast cancer; Doxorubicin; Ferritin nanocages; PBMC; T cells
Settore BIO/10 - Biochimica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1047204
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