Selenium is a trace element found in many chemical forms. Selenium and its species have nutritional and toxicologic properties, some of which may play a role in the etiology of neurological disease. We hypothesized that adherence to the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet could influence intake and endogenous concentrations of selenium and selenium species, thus contributing to the beneficial effects of this dietary pattern. We carried out a cross-sectional study of 137 non-smoking blood donors (75 females and 62 males) from the Reggio Emilia province, Northern Italy. We assessed MIND diet adherence using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We assessed selenium exposure through dietary intake and measurement of urinary and serum concentrations, including speciation of selenium compound in serum. We fitted non-linear spline-based regression models to investigate the association between MIND diet adherence and selenium exposure concentrations. Adherence to the MIND diet was positively associated with dietary selenium intake and urinary selenium excretion, whereas it was inversely associated with serum concentrations of overall selenium and organic selenium, including serum selenoprotein P-bound selenium, the most abundant circulating chemical form of the metalloid. MIND diet adherence also showed an inverted U-shaped relation with inorganic selenium and particularly with its hexavalent form, selenate. Our results suggest that greater adherence to the MIND diet is non-linearly associated with lower circulating concentrations of selenium and of 2 potentially neurotoxic species of this element, selenoprotein P and selenate. This may explain why adherence to the MIND dietary pattern may reduce cognitive decline.

Adherence to the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet and exposure to selenium species: A cross-sectional study / T. Urbano, T. Filippini, M. Malavolti, S. Fustinoni, B. Michalke, L.A. Wise, M. Vinceti. - In: NUTRITION RESEARCH. - ISSN 0271-5317. - 122:(2024), pp. 44-54. [10.1016/j.nutres.2023.12.002]

Adherence to the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet and exposure to selenium species: A cross-sectional study

S. Fustinoni;
2024

Abstract

Selenium is a trace element found in many chemical forms. Selenium and its species have nutritional and toxicologic properties, some of which may play a role in the etiology of neurological disease. We hypothesized that adherence to the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet could influence intake and endogenous concentrations of selenium and selenium species, thus contributing to the beneficial effects of this dietary pattern. We carried out a cross-sectional study of 137 non-smoking blood donors (75 females and 62 males) from the Reggio Emilia province, Northern Italy. We assessed MIND diet adherence using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We assessed selenium exposure through dietary intake and measurement of urinary and serum concentrations, including speciation of selenium compound in serum. We fitted non-linear spline-based regression models to investigate the association between MIND diet adherence and selenium exposure concentrations. Adherence to the MIND diet was positively associated with dietary selenium intake and urinary selenium excretion, whereas it was inversely associated with serum concentrations of overall selenium and organic selenium, including serum selenoprotein P-bound selenium, the most abundant circulating chemical form of the metalloid. MIND diet adherence also showed an inverted U-shaped relation with inorganic selenium and particularly with its hexavalent form, selenate. Our results suggest that greater adherence to the MIND diet is non-linearly associated with lower circulating concentrations of selenium and of 2 potentially neurotoxic species of this element, selenoprotein P and selenate. This may explain why adherence to the MIND dietary pattern may reduce cognitive decline.
Cognitive decline; MIND diet; Neurodegeneration; Prevention; Selenium; Selenium species
Settore MED/44 - Medicina del Lavoro
2024
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1027915
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