Background: As alcohol-related health problems continue to rise, the attention of policy-makers is increasingly turning to Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) programmes. The effectiveness of such programmes in primary healthcare is well evidenced, but very few cost-effectiveness analyses have been conducted and none which specifically consider the Italian context. Methods: The Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model has been used to model the cost-effectiveness of government pricing and public health policies in several countries including England. This study adapts the model using Italian data to evaluate a programme of screening and brief interventions in Italy. Results are reported as Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) of SBI programmes versus a ‘do-nothing’ scenario. Results: Model results show such programmes to be highly cost-effective, with estimated ICERs of €550/Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) gained for a programme of SBI at next GP registration and €590/QALY for SBI at next GP consultation. A range of sensitivity analyses suggest these results are robust under all but the most pessimistic assumptions. Conclusions: This study provides strong support for the promotion of a policy of screening and brief interventions throughout Italy, although policy makers should be aware of the resource implications of different implementation options

Cost-effectiveness of a programme of screening and brief interventions for alchool in primary care in Italy / C. Angus, E. Scafato, S. Ghirini, A. Torbica, F. Ferre', P. Struzzo, R. Purshouse, A. Brennan. - In: BMC FAMILY PRACTICE. - ISSN 1471-2296. - 15:26(2014), pp. 1-12. [10.1186/1471-2296-15-26]

Cost-effectiveness of a programme of screening and brief interventions for alchool in primary care in Italy

F. Ferre';
2014

Abstract

Background: As alcohol-related health problems continue to rise, the attention of policy-makers is increasingly turning to Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) programmes. The effectiveness of such programmes in primary healthcare is well evidenced, but very few cost-effectiveness analyses have been conducted and none which specifically consider the Italian context. Methods: The Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model has been used to model the cost-effectiveness of government pricing and public health policies in several countries including England. This study adapts the model using Italian data to evaluate a programme of screening and brief interventions in Italy. Results are reported as Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) of SBI programmes versus a ‘do-nothing’ scenario. Results: Model results show such programmes to be highly cost-effective, with estimated ICERs of €550/Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) gained for a programme of SBI at next GP registration and €590/QALY for SBI at next GP consultation. A range of sensitivity analyses suggest these results are robust under all but the most pessimistic assumptions. Conclusions: This study provides strong support for the promotion of a policy of screening and brief interventions throughout Italy, although policy makers should be aware of the resource implications of different implementation options
Public health interventions; Alcohol; Primary Care; cost-effectiveness
Settore SECS-P/07 - Economia Aziendale
   Optimizing delivery of health care interventions
   ODHIN
   European Commission
   SEVENTH FRAMEWORK PROGRAMME
   259268
2014
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-15-26
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1023572
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