Some insect species have gained attention as efficient bioconverters of low-value organic substrates (i.e., residual streams) into high-value biomass. Black soldier fly (BSF) (Hermetia illucens) larvae are particularly interesting for bioconversion due to their ability to grow on a wide range of substrates, including low-value industrial residual streams. This is in part due to the plasticity of the gut microbiota of polyphagous insects, like BSF. Gut microbiota composition varies depending on rearing substrates, via a mechanism that might support the recruitment of microorganisms that facilitate digestion of a specific substrate. At the same time, specific microbial genera do persist on different substrates via unknown mechanisms. This study aimed to offer insights on this microbial plasticity by investigating how the composition of the bacterial community present in the gut of BSF larvae responds to two industrial residual streams: swill (a mixture of catering and supermarket leftovers) and distiller’s dried grains with solubles. The bacterial biota composition of substrates, whole larvae at the beginning of the rearing period and at harvest, rearing residues, and larval gut regions were investigated through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It was observed that both substrate and insect development influenced the bacterial composition of the whole larvae. Zooming in on the gut regions, there was a clear shift in community composition from a higher to a lower diversity between the anterior/middle midgut and the posterior midgut/hindgut, indicating a selective pressure occurring in the middle midgut region. Additionally, the abundance of the bacterial biota was always high in the hindgut, while its diversity was relatively low. Even more, the bacterial community in the hindgut was found to be relatively more conserved over the different substrates, harboring members of the BSF core microbiota. We postulate a potential role of the hindgut as a reservoir for insect-associated microbes. This warrants further research on that underexplored region of the intestinal tract. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the bacterial biota structure and dynamics along the intestinal tract, which can aid microbiome engineering efforts to enhance larval performance on (industrial) residual streams.

Bacterial biota composition in gut regions of black soldier fly larvae reared on industrial residual streams: revealing community dynamics along its intestinal tract / D. Vandeweyer, D. Bruno, M. Bonelli, F. Ijdema, B. Lievens, S. Crauwels, M. Casartelli, G. Tettamanti, J. De Smet. - In: FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY. - ISSN 1664-302X. - 14:(2023 Dec), pp. 1276187.1-1276187.16. [10.3389/fmicb.2023.1276187]

Bacterial biota composition in gut regions of black soldier fly larvae reared on industrial residual streams: revealing community dynamics along its intestinal tract

M. Bonelli;M. Casartelli;
2023

Abstract

Some insect species have gained attention as efficient bioconverters of low-value organic substrates (i.e., residual streams) into high-value biomass. Black soldier fly (BSF) (Hermetia illucens) larvae are particularly interesting for bioconversion due to their ability to grow on a wide range of substrates, including low-value industrial residual streams. This is in part due to the plasticity of the gut microbiota of polyphagous insects, like BSF. Gut microbiota composition varies depending on rearing substrates, via a mechanism that might support the recruitment of microorganisms that facilitate digestion of a specific substrate. At the same time, specific microbial genera do persist on different substrates via unknown mechanisms. This study aimed to offer insights on this microbial plasticity by investigating how the composition of the bacterial community present in the gut of BSF larvae responds to two industrial residual streams: swill (a mixture of catering and supermarket leftovers) and distiller’s dried grains with solubles. The bacterial biota composition of substrates, whole larvae at the beginning of the rearing period and at harvest, rearing residues, and larval gut regions were investigated through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It was observed that both substrate and insect development influenced the bacterial composition of the whole larvae. Zooming in on the gut regions, there was a clear shift in community composition from a higher to a lower diversity between the anterior/middle midgut and the posterior midgut/hindgut, indicating a selective pressure occurring in the middle midgut region. Additionally, the abundance of the bacterial biota was always high in the hindgut, while its diversity was relatively low. Even more, the bacterial community in the hindgut was found to be relatively more conserved over the different substrates, harboring members of the BSF core microbiota. We postulate a potential role of the hindgut as a reservoir for insect-associated microbes. This warrants further research on that underexplored region of the intestinal tract. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the bacterial biota structure and dynamics along the intestinal tract, which can aid microbiome engineering efforts to enhance larval performance on (industrial) residual streams.
Hermetia illucens; Illumina MiSeq; bacterial community; gut regions; hindgut; microbiota
Settore AGR/11 - Entomologia Generale e Applicata
dic-2023
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1021528
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