Background: Predictors of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection and determinants of RSV unfavorable outcomes are still unclear. We assessed RSV burden and investigated the risk factors associated with RSV positive swab and RSV severe disease. Methods: A retrospective, single center, cohort study included all consecutive patients referred to the emergency department of L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan) with flu-like symptoms or acute respiratory failure (aRF) tested per protocol for SARS-CoV-2, RSV, Influenza A (InvA) during the 2022-2023 autumn/winter season. Clinical characteristics and patients' outcomes were registered. Respiratory failure, need for respiratory support, shock, sepsis or in-hospital death defined severe disease. Main findings: The analysis included 717 patients (65.1% negative swab, 14.1% InvA, 8.5% RSV, 8.6% SARS-CoV-2, 3.6% other viruses). Compared with the study cohort, RSV patients had the highest occurrence of aRF (62.7%) and severe disease (70.5%); mortality was similar to InvA (6.6% vs 5.9%, p = 0.874). Compared with InvA patients, RSV patients were older (p = 0.009), had higher Charlson index (p = 0.001), higher prevalence of chronic heart failure (p = 0.001) and were more frequently on ICS (p = 0.026) and immunosuppressants (p = 0.018). Heart failure [OR (95%CI):3.286 (1.031-10.835); p = 0.041], chronic exposure to ICS [OR (95%CI):2.377 (1.254-4.505); p = 0.008] and immunosuppressants [OR (95%CI):3.661 (1.246-10.754); p = 0.018] predicted RSV infection. Glycaemia ≥120 mg/dL [OR (95%CI):5.839 (1.155-29.519); p = 0.033], leucocytes ≥8000 cells/μL [OR (95%CI):5.929 (1.090-32.268); p = 0.039], and past/active smoking [OR (95%CI):7.347 (1.301-41.500); p = 0.024] predicted severe RSV disease. Conclusions: RSV infection is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Preventive strategies for RSV infection such as vaccination are highly warranted, especially in older patients with cardiovascular and chronic respiratory conditions.

Respiratory syncytial virus burden and risk factors for severe disease in patients presenting to the emergency department with flu-like symptoms or acute respiratory failure / P. Santus, D. Radovanovic, M.R. Gismondo, S.G. Rimoldi, A. Lombardi, F. Danzo, A. Gori, S. Antinori, G. Rizzardini. - In: RESPIRATORY MEDICINE. - ISSN 0954-6111. - 218:(2023 Nov), pp. 107404.1-107404.7. [10.1016/j.rmed.2023.107404]

Respiratory syncytial virus burden and risk factors for severe disease in patients presenting to the emergency department with flu-like symptoms or acute respiratory failure

P. Santus
Primo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
D. Radovanovic
Secondo
;
M.R. Gismondo;F. Danzo;A. Gori;S. Antinori
Penultimo
;
2023

Abstract

Background: Predictors of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection and determinants of RSV unfavorable outcomes are still unclear. We assessed RSV burden and investigated the risk factors associated with RSV positive swab and RSV severe disease. Methods: A retrospective, single center, cohort study included all consecutive patients referred to the emergency department of L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan) with flu-like symptoms or acute respiratory failure (aRF) tested per protocol for SARS-CoV-2, RSV, Influenza A (InvA) during the 2022-2023 autumn/winter season. Clinical characteristics and patients' outcomes were registered. Respiratory failure, need for respiratory support, shock, sepsis or in-hospital death defined severe disease. Main findings: The analysis included 717 patients (65.1% negative swab, 14.1% InvA, 8.5% RSV, 8.6% SARS-CoV-2, 3.6% other viruses). Compared with the study cohort, RSV patients had the highest occurrence of aRF (62.7%) and severe disease (70.5%); mortality was similar to InvA (6.6% vs 5.9%, p = 0.874). Compared with InvA patients, RSV patients were older (p = 0.009), had higher Charlson index (p = 0.001), higher prevalence of chronic heart failure (p = 0.001) and were more frequently on ICS (p = 0.026) and immunosuppressants (p = 0.018). Heart failure [OR (95%CI):3.286 (1.031-10.835); p = 0.041], chronic exposure to ICS [OR (95%CI):2.377 (1.254-4.505); p = 0.008] and immunosuppressants [OR (95%CI):3.661 (1.246-10.754); p = 0.018] predicted RSV infection. Glycaemia ≥120 mg/dL [OR (95%CI):5.839 (1.155-29.519); p = 0.033], leucocytes ≥8000 cells/μL [OR (95%CI):5.929 (1.090-32.268); p = 0.039], and past/active smoking [OR (95%CI):7.347 (1.301-41.500); p = 0.024] predicted severe RSV disease. Conclusions: RSV infection is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Preventive strategies for RSV infection such as vaccination are highly warranted, especially in older patients with cardiovascular and chronic respiratory conditions.
Influenza virus; Mortality; Pneumonia; Predictors; Respiratory failure; Respiratory syncytial virus
Settore MED/10 - Malattie dell'Apparato Respiratorio
Settore MED/17 - Malattie Infettive
Settore MED/07 - Microbiologia e Microbiologia Clinica
nov-2023
6-set-2023
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1013929
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