Invasive Alien Species (IAS), i.e. species introduced by humans outside their natural geographic range, may act as host or vectors of pathogens of both human and animal health relevance. Although it has been recognized that IAS should deserve more attention from a public and animal health perspective, data on the pathogens hosted by these species are not systematically collected and this prevents accurate assessments of IAS-specific risks of disease transmission.To support the future development of disease risk assessments, we systematically reviewed the scientific literature related to the pathogens of the eleven mammal species included in the European list of IAS of concern to gain insight in the amount and quality of data available. Data were analyzed to assess the current knowledge on the pathogens harbored by mammal IAS in natural conditions, through the identification of the main factors associated with research intensity on IAS pathogens and with the IAS observed pathogen species richness, the estimation of the true pathogen species richness for each IAS, and a meta-analysis of prevalence for the pathogens of health relevance.While the review confirmed that mammal IAS harbor pathogens of human and animal health relevance such as rabies virus, West Nile Virus, Borrelia burgdorferi and Mycobacterium bovis, results also highlighted strong information gaps and biases in research on IAS pathogens. In addition, the analyses showed an underestimation of the number of pathogens harbored by these species and the existence of high levels of uncertainty in the prevalence of the pathogens of health significance identified.These results highlight the need towards more efforts in making the available information on IAS pathogens accessible and systematically collected in order to provide data for future investigations and risk assessments, as well as the need of relying on alternative sources of information to assess IAS disease risk, like expert opinions.

Knowledge gaps in invasive species infections: Alien mammals of European Union concern as a case study / E. Chinchio, C. Romeo, M. Crotta, N. Ferrari. - In: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. - ISSN 0048-9697. - 846:(2022 Nov 10), pp. 157448.1-157448.9. [10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.157448]

Knowledge gaps in invasive species infections: Alien mammals of European Union concern as a case study

E. Chinchio
Primo
;
C. Romeo
Secondo
;
M. Crotta
Penultimo
;
N. Ferrari
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Invasive Alien Species (IAS), i.e. species introduced by humans outside their natural geographic range, may act as host or vectors of pathogens of both human and animal health relevance. Although it has been recognized that IAS should deserve more attention from a public and animal health perspective, data on the pathogens hosted by these species are not systematically collected and this prevents accurate assessments of IAS-specific risks of disease transmission.To support the future development of disease risk assessments, we systematically reviewed the scientific literature related to the pathogens of the eleven mammal species included in the European list of IAS of concern to gain insight in the amount and quality of data available. Data were analyzed to assess the current knowledge on the pathogens harbored by mammal IAS in natural conditions, through the identification of the main factors associated with research intensity on IAS pathogens and with the IAS observed pathogen species richness, the estimation of the true pathogen species richness for each IAS, and a meta-analysis of prevalence for the pathogens of health relevance.While the review confirmed that mammal IAS harbor pathogens of human and animal health relevance such as rabies virus, West Nile Virus, Borrelia burgdorferi and Mycobacterium bovis, results also highlighted strong information gaps and biases in research on IAS pathogens. In addition, the analyses showed an underestimation of the number of pathogens harbored by these species and the existence of high levels of uncertainty in the prevalence of the pathogens of health significance identified.These results highlight the need towards more efforts in making the available information on IAS pathogens accessible and systematically collected in order to provide data for future investigations and risk assessments, as well as the need of relying on alternative sources of information to assess IAS disease risk, like expert opinions.
Biological invasions; Emerging infectious diseases; IAS; Knowledge gap; Pathogens; Risk assessment;
Settore VET/06 - Parassitologia e Malattie Parassitarie degli Animali
Settore VET/05 - Malattie Infettive degli Animali Domestici
Settore BIO/05 - Zoologia
Settore BIO/07 - Ecologia
10-nov-2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1004369
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