Rett syndrome (RTT) is a X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder which represents the leading cause of severe incurable intellectual disability in females worldwide. The vast majority of RTT cases are caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, and preclinical studies on RTT largely benefit from the use of mouse models of Mecp2, which present a broad spectrum of symptoms phenocopying those manifested by RTT patients. Neurons represent the core targets of the pathology; however, neuroanatomical abnormalities that regionally characterize the Mecp2 deficient mammalian brain remain ill-defined. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and MRS, represent a key approach for assessing in vivo anatomic and metabolic changes in brain. Being non-invasive, these analyses also permit to investigate how the disease progresses over time through longitudinal studies. To foster the biological comprehension of RTT and identify useful biomarkers, we have performed a thorough in vivo longitudinal study of MRI and MRS in Mecp2 deficient mouse brains. Analyses were performed on both genders of two different mouse models of RTT, using an automatic atlas-based segmentation tool that permitted to obtain a detailed and unbiased description of the whole RTT mouse brain. We found that the most robust alteration of the RTT brain consists in an overall reduction of the brain volume. Accordingly, Mecp2 deficiency generally delays brain growth, eventually leading, in heterozygous older animals, to stagnation and/or contraction. Most but not all brain regions participate in the observed deficiency in brain size; similarly, the volumetric defect progresses diversely in different brain areas also depending on the specific Mecp2 genetic lesion and gender. Interestingly, in some regions volumetric defects anticipate overt symptoms, possibly revealing where the pathology originates and providing a useful biomarker for assessing drug efficacy in pre-clinical studies.

A comprehensive longitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging identifies novel features of the Mecp2 deficient mouse brain / S. Carli, L. Chaabane, G. De Rocco, E. Albizzati, I. Sormonta, S. Calligaro, P. Bonizzi, A. Frasca, N. Landsberger. - In: NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE. - ISSN 1095-953X. - 180:(2023 May), pp. 106083.1-106083.17. [10.1016/j.nbd.2023.106083]

A comprehensive longitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging identifies novel features of the Mecp2 deficient mouse brain

G. De Rocco;E. Albizzati;A. Frasca
Penultimo
;
N. Landsberger
Co-ultimo
2023

Abstract

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder which represents the leading cause of severe incurable intellectual disability in females worldwide. The vast majority of RTT cases are caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, and preclinical studies on RTT largely benefit from the use of mouse models of Mecp2, which present a broad spectrum of symptoms phenocopying those manifested by RTT patients. Neurons represent the core targets of the pathology; however, neuroanatomical abnormalities that regionally characterize the Mecp2 deficient mammalian brain remain ill-defined. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and MRS, represent a key approach for assessing in vivo anatomic and metabolic changes in brain. Being non-invasive, these analyses also permit to investigate how the disease progresses over time through longitudinal studies. To foster the biological comprehension of RTT and identify useful biomarkers, we have performed a thorough in vivo longitudinal study of MRI and MRS in Mecp2 deficient mouse brains. Analyses were performed on both genders of two different mouse models of RTT, using an automatic atlas-based segmentation tool that permitted to obtain a detailed and unbiased description of the whole RTT mouse brain. We found that the most robust alteration of the RTT brain consists in an overall reduction of the brain volume. Accordingly, Mecp2 deficiency generally delays brain growth, eventually leading, in heterozygous older animals, to stagnation and/or contraction. Most but not all brain regions participate in the observed deficiency in brain size; similarly, the volumetric defect progresses diversely in different brain areas also depending on the specific Mecp2 genetic lesion and gender. Interestingly, in some regions volumetric defects anticipate overt symptoms, possibly revealing where the pathology originates and providing a useful biomarker for assessing drug efficacy in pre-clinical studies.
English
Biomarkers; In vivo MRI/MRS studies; Mecp2 mouse models; Neurodevelopment; Neuroimaging; Rett syndrome (RTT);
Settore BIO/11 - Biologia Molecolare
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Ricerca applicata
Pubblicazione scientifica
mag-2023
15-mar-2023
Elsevier
180
106083
1
17
17
Pubblicato
Periodico con rilevanza internazionale
scopus
pubmed
crossref
Aderisco
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
A comprehensive longitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging identifies novel features of the Mecp2 deficient mouse brain / S. Carli, L. Chaabane, G. De Rocco, E. Albizzati, I. Sormonta, S. Calligaro, P. Bonizzi, A. Frasca, N. Landsberger. - In: NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE. - ISSN 1095-953X. - 180:(2023 May), pp. 106083.1-106083.17. [10.1016/j.nbd.2023.106083]
open
Prodotti della ricerca::01 - Articolo su periodico
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S. Carli, L. Chaabane, G. De Rocco, E. Albizzati, I. Sormonta, S. Calligaro, P. Bonizzi, A. Frasca, N. Landsberger
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/961979
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