Despite the widespread diffusion of direct-to-consumer genetic testing (GT), it is still unclear whether people who learn about their genetic susceptibility to a clinical condition change their behaviors, and the psychological factors involved. The aim of the present study is to investigate long-term changes in health-related choices, individual tendencies and risk attitudes in an Italian sample of GT users. In the context of the Mind the Risk study, which investigated a sample of Italian adults who underwent GT in a private laboratory, 99 clients participated in the follow up assessment. They completed a self-administered questionnaire investigating: (a) clinical history and motivation for testing, (b) lifestyle and risk behaviors, (c) individual tendencies toward health, and (d) risk-taking attitude and risk tolerance. Such variables were measured at three different time-points: T0—before GT, T1—at 6 months after genetic results, and T2—at 1 year from results. Results showed that, at baseline, participants who stated they intended to modify their behavior after GT results, effectively did so over time. This result held both for participants who received a positive or negative test result. In general, a healthier diet was the most frequently observed long-term behavioral change. As regards psychological variables, a risk-taking attitude and risk tolerance did not seem to affect the decision to change the lifestyle. Finally, we found an overall reduction in anxiety and worry over health over time, but also a reduction in the motivation for health promotion and prevention, health esteem, and positive expectations for their health in the future.

What people really change after genetic testing (GT) performed in private labs : results from an Italian study / S. Oliveri, C. Cincidda, G. Ongaro, I. Cutica, A. Gorini, F. Spinella, F. Fiorentino, M. Baldi, G. Pravettoni. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN GENETICS. - ISSN 1018-4813. - (2021 Apr 12). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1038/s41431-021-00879-w]

What people really change after genetic testing (GT) performed in private labs : results from an Italian study

Cincidda C.;Ongaro G.;Cutica I.;Gorini A.;Pravettoni G.
2021-04-12

Abstract

Despite the widespread diffusion of direct-to-consumer genetic testing (GT), it is still unclear whether people who learn about their genetic susceptibility to a clinical condition change their behaviors, and the psychological factors involved. The aim of the present study is to investigate long-term changes in health-related choices, individual tendencies and risk attitudes in an Italian sample of GT users. In the context of the Mind the Risk study, which investigated a sample of Italian adults who underwent GT in a private laboratory, 99 clients participated in the follow up assessment. They completed a self-administered questionnaire investigating: (a) clinical history and motivation for testing, (b) lifestyle and risk behaviors, (c) individual tendencies toward health, and (d) risk-taking attitude and risk tolerance. Such variables were measured at three different time-points: T0—before GT, T1—at 6 months after genetic results, and T2—at 1 year from results. Results showed that, at baseline, participants who stated they intended to modify their behavior after GT results, effectively did so over time. This result held both for participants who received a positive or negative test result. In general, a healthier diet was the most frequently observed long-term behavioral change. As regards psychological variables, a risk-taking attitude and risk tolerance did not seem to affect the decision to change the lifestyle. Finally, we found an overall reduction in anxiety and worry over health over time, but also a reduction in the motivation for health promotion and prevention, health esteem, and positive expectations for their health in the future.
Settore M-PSI/01 - Psicologia Generale
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN GENETICS
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/853834
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